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Nephrectomy:

 

Option 2: Nephrectomy

Surgery—the definitive treatment:

 

Performing a nephrectomy remains the primary treatment for kidney cancer caught before spreading to distant regions of the body. Most often, the surgeon performs a radical nephrectomy, removing the whole along with the adrenal gland and the tissue around the kidney. Some lymph nodes in the area may also be removed. In some cases, the surgeon removes only the kidney (simple nephrectomy)

The remaining kidney generally is able to perform the work of both kidneys. In another procedure, partial nephrectomy, the surgeon removes just the part of the kidney that contains the tumour.

The surgeon will usually remove the whole of the affected and surrounding tissue. Removing a kidney is a big operation that requires the person to be reasonably fit. Because of this, surgery may not be possible for everyone. This operation is not normally recommended for a person over 60 years old.

When patients are treated with early-stage disease, they have a very high 10 year survival rate. They have a 95% chance of not having tumours recur within 10 years. "Today, surgery often perform the nephrectomy laparoscopically making several small incisions through which they insert instruments that allow them to view the surgery field. Patients typically report less pain and recover faster.

This surgery may not be possible for everyone. This operation is not normally recommended for a person over 70 years old.

A procedure called a hand-assisted laparoscopic nephrectomy has shown to be as effective as an open surgery for kidney cancer. During a hand-assisted procedure, the abdomen is slightly inflated and the surgeon makes an additional incision about 3.5 inches long through which the kidney is removed manually.

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       NEPHRECTOMY

      A biographical report of my Kidney Cancer Cryosurgical treatment.By K Henley. Revised 10 February 2003

 

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